Data Sources

Jump to [Sources of Equipment] [Satellite imagery] [Environmental data] [State resources] [Other links]

Drones (also known as UAVs—unmanned aerial vehicles—and UAS—unmanned aerial systems)

EOS-WEBSTER, at the University of New Hampshire, is the primary repository of satellite imagery for the Measuring Vegetation Health project. Use DEW software programs with pictures of satellite imagery, and use Multispec (free software developed by Purdue University) to process the data to create images (guides will be available soon). Several data sets tailored to Digital Earth Watch activities are under development and will be available shortly.

See their easy-to-use Landsat Clic 'N Pic to find Landsat images for the United States.

Download:

DEW Guide to selecting and ordering MODIS images from EOS-WEBSTER, and for analyzing the images using Multispec

EOS Webster logo

There are additional sites for satellite imagery and maps that are useful for either learning how to use satellite imagery or for gathering information about environmental conditions in your region.

Satellite Imagery for Training

EarthShots, created by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), provide decades of satellite imagery for different sites around the globe. Valuable articles accompany data for each site. Download images to your computer and use the following software to analyze the data in the images: Digital Image Basics, Analyzing Digital Images, and Vegetation Analysis, all if which are available in the DEW software bundle. Download guided activities to learn to use the images and software described above (PDF) and accompanying teacher guide (PDF).

EarthKAM allows students to coordinate taking digital pictures from the International Space Station through NASA. Imagery may be processed using the Digital Image Basics and Analyzing Digital Images software. Guided activities are under development and will be available soon.

Take a tour of the globe with Google Earth.

Terraserver USA. View the United States with aerial photographs. Cannot download images, but a good start in using aerial photographs.

Worldwind (NASA) http://worldwindserver.net/webworldwind/apps/Explorer.html - interactive views of Earth with various data sets.

Views of Earth — daily images of the full, sunlit side of the Earth every day taken by Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) one million miles away acquired from 12 to 36 hours earlier using the Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC). Daily sequence of images  show the Earth as it rotates, revealing the whole globe over the course of a day. See Press Release.  

Free Imagery and Maps of Environmental Data

NASA's Earth Observatory data sets may be used with MVHimage, plus use the many articles that describe research and provide training and background information. Also, see the Blue Marble Next Generation data sets.

NASA's Visible Earth, which provides a number of data sets and animations for many Earth systems science processes.

Educator's Guide to NASA Earth Science Images & Data
http://nasaesw.strategies.org/images-data-educators-guide-to-nasa-earth-science-images-and-data/
PDF: http://nasaesw.strategies.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/EducGuide_508Fin.pdf

NASA educational activities related to mapping (through NASA Wavelength)
http://www.nasawavelength.org/resource-search?qq=mapping&facetSort=1&sortAscendingBy=title&n=100

The Global Land Cover Facility (GLCF) provides a wealth of satellite data, which will need proper software to process, visualize, and analyze the data. Consider using the free Multispec software from Purdue University to work with the satellite data.

There are a number of data sources provided at the Earth Systems Information Partners (ESIP) web site.

PollenViewer: Interactive, animated viewer of color-coded maps showing the how the distribution of plant species changed over the past 21,000 years as the ice sheets retreated northward in North America. Activity to use MVHimage with the maps is under development with the Earth Exploration Toolbook.

Free State Resources

Get to know your state's resources, in particular your state Geographic Information Systems (GIS) organization. For example, there are a wealth of data provided byMassGIS.

Many states also provide free digital aerial photographs for download. For example, see the aerial photos available Massachusetts.

Search for historic USGS topographic maps, such as the site for New England.

Other Useful Links:

Landsat Clic 'n Pic

G.I.S. Data for U.S.

Plant and Environmental Data

PicturePost Information

See also

 

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Alan D. GOULD,
Feb 1, 2012, 12:35 PM